PAST NEUR G045 & M045 INVIGILATED ESSAY.

 

 


NEURG045/M045 Visual Neuroscience 2016

Time allowed: 90 minutes

2015

Students may have access to unmarked copies of the three articles during the exam that they bring, but otherwise the exam will be unseen. You have 90 minutes.

What is meant by a ‘double-opponent’ receptive field organisation? Explain how cells of this type may be created, and what role they may play in colour vision.

Assigned papers:

Conway, B. R., Chatterjee, S., Field, G. D., Horwitz, G. D., Johnson, E. N., Koida, K., & Mancuso, K. (2010). Advances in color science: from retina to behavior. Journal of Neuroscience, 30(45), 14955-14963. doi: 10.1523/JNEUROSCI.4348-10.2010
Shapley, R., & Hawken, M. J. (2011). Color in the Cortex: single- and double-opponent cells. Vision Research, 51(7), 701-717. doi: DOI 10.1016/j.visres.2011.02.012
Solomon, S. G., & Lennie, P. (2007). The machinery of colour vision. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 8(4), 276-286. doi: 10.1038/nrn2094

 


NEURG045/M045 Visual Neuroscience 2016

Time allowed: 90 minutes

2017

Students may have access to unmarked copies of the three articles during the exam that they bring, but otherwise the exam will be unseen. You have 90 minutes.

How do the visual pathways that carry the short-wavelength cone signals differ from those that carry the signals from the long-wavelength and middle-wavelength cones? How would these difference affect what we would see if our vision depended just on the short-wavelength cones and their pathways?

Papers available before and during exam:
Solomon, S. G., & Lennie, P. (2007). The machinery of colour vision. Nature Reviews Neuroscience, 8(4), 276-286.
Gegenfurtner, K. (2001). Color in the cortex revisited. Nature Neuroscience, 4(4), 339-340.
Conway, B. R., Chatterjee, S., Field, G. D., Horwitz, G. D., Johnson, E. N., Koida, K., & Mancuso, K. (2010). Advances in color science: from retina to behavior. Journal of Neuroscience, 30(45), 14955-14963.